Aristida surperuanensis (Poaceae, Aristidoideae), a new species from a desert valley in southern Peru

Harol Gutiérrez, Roxana Yanina Castañeda Sifuentes, Victor Quipuscoa, Paul M. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aristida surperuanensis sp. nov. is described and illustrated. The new species, from southern Moquegua (Peru), differs from A. flaccida in having contracted panicles, spikelets to 1–1.1 cm long and lemmas 5.5–6.5 mm long. The central awn is straight, ascending, 3–6 mm long and lacking a column, the lateral awns are ascending, 1–2.5 mm long and 1/3 as long as the central awns, and the caryopses are fusiform and 4–4.5 (–6) mm long. A key to the species of Aristida in Peru is included and the conservation status of the new species is evaluated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)182-188
Number of pages7
JournalPhytotaxa
Volume419
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Oct 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Hilda Maria Longhi-Wagner for constructive comments that helped us improve the manuscript, the directors of the HSP, HUSA and HUT herbaria for facilitating access to their collections and Henry Casta?eda for editing the illustration. Financial support was partly provided by the Universidad Cient?fica del Sur, Lima, Per? (Resoluci?n Directoral No. 01-DGIDI-Cientifica-2019).

Funding Information:
We thank Hilda Maria Longhi-Wagner for constructive comments that helped us improve the manuscript, the directors of the HSP, HUSA and HUT herbaria for facilitating access to their collections and Henry Castañeda for editing the illustration. Financial support was partly provided by the Universidad Científica del Sur, Lima, Perú (Resolución Directoral No. 01-DGIDI-Cientifica-2019).

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Grasses
  • Moquegua
  • South America
  • Taxonomy

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