Control of cystic echinococcosis: Background and prospects

Edmundo Larrieu, Cesar M. Gavidia, Marshall W. Lightowlers

Research output: Contribution to journalScientific review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

© 2019 Blackwell Verlag GmbH Cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by Echinococcus granulosus, is a chronic and debilitating zoonotic larval cestode infection in humans, which is principally transmitted between dogs and domestic livestock, particularly sheep. Human CE occurs in almost all pastoral communities and rangeland areas of the underdeveloped and developed world. Control programmes against CE have been implemented in several endemic countries to reduce or eliminate the disease. New Zealand and Tasmania are examples of some of the first programmes to be undertaken (in insular territories) and which were very successful in the elimination of CE. The advent and proven effectiveness of praziquantel, plus the experience of insular models, produced high expectations for rapid advances in a second generation of control programmes undertaken in continental areas (Argentina, Uruguay and Chile). Nevertheless, only moderate gains in CE control have been made and the impact on prevalence among humans has been slight. A major impediment to the adoption of procedures that were successful in New Zealand and Tasmania has been the requirement to administer praziquantel to dogs in rural areas eight times per year over numerous years. In addition, there have been clear technological improvements made in the diagnosis of canine echinococcosis for surveillance, the genetic characterization of parasite strains and in vaccination against CE infection in livestock. In order to establish new paradigms and appropriate combinations of control strategies, we have carried out a review and discussion of the available control tools and control models. Control strategies must be suitable and sustainable to benefit the Echinococcosis–endemic areas primarily, which at the same time are the poorest regions of the world.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)889-899
Number of pages11
JournalZoonoses and Public Health
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2019

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