Detección de animales portadores del virus del cólera porcino en una granja tecnificada del valle de Lima

Translated title of the contribution: Detection of animals carrying the hog cholera virus in a well-managed pig farm of Lima valley

C. Iván Camargo, G. Hermelinda Rivera, Z. Afredo Benito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this study was to identify animal carriers of the Hog Cholera virus (HCV) post vaccination in a well-managed pig farm ofLima valley. A total of 166 serum samples were collected from 166piglets between 6 and 7 weeks of age, vaccinated against Hog Cholera 15 days befare sampling. Specific HCV antibodies were detected using a blocking ELISA test. Eighty eight (146/166) of animals reacted positively against HCV; 3% (5/166) and 9% (15/166) of animals were considered suspects and negatives to antibodies, respectively. A second sample was collected 30 days after the first collection from suspect (n=5) and negative (n=15) animals. HCV was detected by direct inmunofluorescence test using cultivated lymphocytes. At the time of the second sampling, 14 out of20 animals stayed at farm. Antibodies were detected in 6 animals and 8 were negative, however 4 ofthe latter were positive to HCV The results showed that the frequency ofHCV carrier animals was 2.4% (4/166). The lack of antibodies and the presence ofHCV in lymphocytes after vaccination, suggested that those animals were persistently infected and HCV carriers.

Translated title of the contributionDetection of animals carrying the hog cholera virus in a well-managed pig farm of Lima valley
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)56-60
Number of pages5
JournalRevista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Peru
Volume13
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2002

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2002 Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. All rights reserved.

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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