Detection of Taenia solium taeniasis coproantigen is an early indicator of treatment failure for taeniasis

Javier A. Bustos, Silvia Rodriguez, Juan A. Jimenez, Luz M. Moyano, Yesenia Castillo, Viterbo Ayvar, James C. Allan, Philip S. Craig, Armando E. Gonzalez, Robert H. Gilman, Victor C.W. Tsang, Hector H. Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Taenia solium causes taeniasis and cysticercosis, a zoonotic complex associated with a significant burden of epilepsy in most countries. Reliable diagnosis and efficacious treatment of taeniasis are needed for disease control. Currently, cure can be con- firmed only after a period of at least 1 month, by negative stool microscopy. This study assessed the performance of detection by a coproantigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CoAg-ELISA) for the early evaluation of the efficacy of antiparasitic treatment of human T. solium taeniasis. We followed 69 tapeworm carriers who received niclosamide as standard treatment. Stool samples were collected on days 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, and 90 after treatment and were processed by microscopy and CoAg-ELISA. The efficacy of niclosamide was 77.9% (53/68). Thirteen patients received a second course of treatment and completed the follow-up. CoAg-ELISA was therefore evaluated for a total of 81 cases (68 treatments, 13 retreatments). In successful treatments (n = 64), the proportion of patients who became negative by CoAg-ELISA was 62.5% after 3 days, 89.1% after 7 days, 96.9% after 15 days, and 100% after 30 days. In treatment failures (n = 17), the CoAg-ELISA result was positive for 70.6% of patients after 3 days, 94.1% after 7 days, and 100% after 15 and 30 days. Only 2 of 17 samples in cases of treatment failure became positive by microscopy by day 30. The presence of one scolex, but not multiple scolices, in posttreatment stools was strongly associated with cure (odds ratio [OR], 52.5; P<0.001). CoAg-ELISA is useful for the assessment of treatment failure in taeniasis. Early assessment at day 15 would detect treatment failure before patients become infective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)570-573
Number of pages4
JournalClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Detection of Taenia solium taeniasis coproantigen is an early indicator of treatment failure for taeniasis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this