Disruption of the blood-brain barrier in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium, untreated and after anthelmintic treatment

Cristina Guerra-Giraldez, Miguel Marzal, Carla Cangalaya, Diana Balboa, Miguel Ángel Orrego, Adriana Paredes, Eloy Gonzales-Gustavson, Gianfranco Arroyo, Hector H. García, Armando E. González, Siddhartha Mahanty, Theodore E. Nash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neurocysticercosis is a widely prevalent disease in the tropics that causes seizures and a variety into of neurological symptoms in most of the world. Experimental models are limited and do not allow assessment of the degree of inflammation around brain cysts. The vital dye Evans Blue (EB) was injected to 11 pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium cysts to visually identify the extent of disruption of the blood-brain barrier. A total of 369 cysts were recovered from the 11 brains and classified according to the staining of their capsules as blue or unstained. The proportion of cysts with blue capsules was significantly higher in brains from pigs that had received anthelmintic treatment 48 and 120. h before the EB infusion, indicating a greater compromise of the blood-brain barrier due to treatment. The model could be useful for understanding the pathology of treatment-induced inflammation in neurocysticercosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)443-446
Number of pages4
JournalExperimental Parasitology
Volume134
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Valentina Salas for valuable assistance at the preliminary stage, also Teresa López and Linda Gallegos for help at the veterinary facilities. This work was supported in part by an intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Keywords

  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Neurocysticercosis
  • Praziquantel
  • Taenia solium

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