Ectoparasites of pigeons Columba livia traded in a market of the district of San Martin de Porres, Lima, Peru

Asucena I. Naupay, Julia H. Castro, Junior C. Caro, Lucas D. Sevilla, Joe J. Hermosilla, Katherine L. Larraín, Carlos S. Quispe, Oscar R. Panana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, average intensity and mean abundance of ectoparasites in domestic pigeons (Columba livia). A total of 29 specimens were analyzed (17 males and 12 females). External surface of head, neck, chest, back and wings were examined, determining that 93.1% (14.9 ± 15.8 of total mean abundance) of pigeons were infected with one or more ectoparasites. All males and 83.3% of females were parasitized. Seven species of ectoparasites were identified, where five correspond to Order Mallophaga (Columbicola columbae [82.8%], Menopon gallinae [48.3%] Goniodes gigas [31%], Menacanthus stramineus [17.2%] and Lipeurus caponis [6.9%]), one to Order Diptera (Pseudolynchia canariensis [10.3%]), and one to Order Siphonapetra (Echidnophaga gallinacea [3.4%]). The largest number of mallophagans was found on the feathers of the wings and chest. Among associations, the monoparasitism was present in 28%, biparasitism in 28%, triparasitism in 34% and tetraparasitism in 3% of the pigeons. C. columbae was the most prevalent ectoparasite (82.8%). Besides, Menacanthus stramineus and Lipeurus caponis are reported for the first time as ectoparasites of Columba livia in Peru.
Original languageAmerican English
JournalRevista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Peru
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ectoparasites of pigeons Columba livia traded in a market of the district of San Martin de Porres, Lima, Peru'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this