In vitro assessment of plant growth-promoting potential of rhizosphere actinomycetes from Solanum tuberosum sp. andigena

Jessica Cisneros Moscol, Junior Caro Castro, Claudia Mateo Tuesta, Jorge León Quispe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As part of the rhizosphere microbiota, actinomycetes interact with their host by releasing metabolites that positively influence their host’ growth. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the plant growth-promoting capacity of actinomycetes isolated from the rhizosphere of potato crops collected in the city of San Jeronimo, Andahuaylas, Peru. Forty-nine actinomycetes strains were isolated and screened for their capacity to solubilize phosphates, fix atmospheric nitrogen, produce indole acetic acid (IAA) and produce siderophores. Out of the total number of isolates, 33 (63.27%) solubilized phosphates, 42 (87.72%) fixed atmospheric nitrogen, 10 (20.41%) produced IAA and 18 (24.49%) were siderophore producers; strains AND 13 and AND 16 being the top performers. AND 13 was identified by 16S RNAr gene amplification as Streptomyces sp. The results indicate that actinomycetes can be considered as potential PGPR organisms and could be included in biofertilization programs of potato crops as an alternative to agrochemicals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-398
Number of pages8
JournalScientia Agropecuaria
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements The authors thank Vicerrectorado de Investiga-ción y Postgrado (VRIP) - Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos for the provided funding under the Undergraduate Thesis Promotion Fund (Project Code: 151001057) (RR No. 00741-R-15).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 All rights reserved

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Actinomycetes
  • Beneficial microorganisms
  • Biofertilizers
  • Native potato
  • Rhizosphere

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