Relationship between orofacial function, dentofacial morphology, and bite force in young subjects

M. C.S. Marquezin, M. B.D. Gavião, M. B.C.C. Alonso, Laura Ricardina Ramirez Sotelo, F. Haiter-Neto, P. M. Castelo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim was to evaluate the relationship between orofacial function, dentofacial morphology, and bite force in young subjects. Subjects and Methods: Three hundred and sixteen subjects were divided according to dentition stage (early, intermediate, and late mixed and permanent dentition). Orofacial function was screened using the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S). Orthodontic treatment need, bite force, lateral and frontal craniofacial dimensions and presence of sleep bruxism were also assessed. The results were submitted to descriptive statistics, normality and correlation tests, analysis of variance, and multiple linear regression to test the relationship between NOT-S scores and the studied independent variables. Results: The variance of NOT-S scores between groups was not significant. The evaluation of the variables that significantly contributed to NOT-S scores variation showed that age and presence of bruxism related to higher NOT-S total scores, while the increase in overbite measurement and presence of closed lip posture related to lower scores. Bite force did not show a significant relationship with scores of orofacial dysfunction. No significant correlations between craniofacial dimensions and NOT-S scores were observed. Conclusion: Age and sleep bruxism were related to higher NOT-S scores, while the increase in overbite measurement and closed lip posture contributed to lower scores of orofacial dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)567-573
Number of pages7
JournalOral Diseases
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bite force
  • Bruxism
  • Cephalometry
  • Dental occlusion

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