Spatial Inequality Hides the Burden of Dog Bites and the Risk of Dog-Mediated Human Rabies

Micaela de la Puente-León, Michael Z. Levy, Amparo M. Toledo, Sergio Eli Recuenco Cabrera, Julianna Shinnick, Ricardo Castillo-Neyra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since its reintroduction in 2015, rabies has been established as an enzootic disease among the dog population of Arequipa, Peru. Given the unknown rate of dog bites, the risk of human rabies transmission is concerning. Our objective was to estimate the rate of dog bites in the city and to identify factors associated with seeking health care in a medical facility for wound care and rabies prevention follow-up. To this end, we conducted a door-to-door survey with 4,370 adults in 21 urban and 21 periurban communities. We then analyzed associations between seeking health care following dog bites and various socioeconomic factors, stratifying by urban and peri-urban localities. We found a high annual rate of dog bites in peri-urban communities (12.4%), which was 2.6 times higher than that in urban areas (4.8%). Among those who were bitten, the percentage of people who sought medical treatment was almost twice as high in urban areas (39.1%) as in peri-urban areas (21.4%).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1247-1257
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume103
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Financial support: This work was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Grant no. R01 HD075869). R. C. N. was partially supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Grant no. 1K01AI139284). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Funding Information:
Micaela De la Puente-Le?n is a doctoral student studying an Epidemiological Research Doctorate at Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia under FONDECYT/CIENCIACTIVA scholarship EF033-235-2015 and supported by training grant D43 TW007393 awarded by the Fogarty International Center of the US National Institutes of Health. This work was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Grant no. R01 HD075869). R. C. N. was partially supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Grant no. 1K01AI139284). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments: Micaela De la Puente-León is a doctoral student studying an Epidemiological Research Doctorate at Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia under FONDECYT/CIENCIACTIVA scholarship EF033-235-2015 and supported by training grant D43 TW007393 awarded by the Fogarty International Center of the US National Institutes of Health.

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