The pathophysiology of the acute phase of human bartonellosis resembles AIDS

Eduardo Romulo Ticona Chavez, Luz Maria Huaroto Valdivia, Yuri Garcia, Lupe Vargas, Miguel G. Madariaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human bartonellosis is a South American anthroponosis caused by Bartonella bacilliformis. The disease has an acute phase characterized by invasion of red blood cells by parasites, and consequent severe anemia; and a chronic phase presenting with benign vascular tumors. During the acute phase, affected individuals are prone to developing opportunistic infections with a variety of organisms similar to the ones seen in AIDS. After antibiotic treatment is instituted, a subgroup of patients may develop atypical symptoms which potentially represent clinical manifestations of the restoration of macrophage function. We speculate that the pathophysiology of the acute phase of human bartonellosis resembles AIDS, with a period of immunosuppression following the infection and later, clinical manifestations of immune reconstitution subsequent to treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-49
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Hypotheses
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

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